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Kabaddi

Kabaddi is the match of one against seven. Also known as the GAME OF THE MASSES
it has simple, easy to comprehend rules and requires minimum equipment while having
all the ingredients of thrill and excitement
and audience appeal than any other popular
game, such as football or basketball enjoy.
This is probably the only game of offence
and defense in which attack is an individual
attempt, while defense is a combined effort.

The SKA (Southampton Kabaddi Association)
is a voluntary organisation based in
Southampton. It has a team of qualified
Male and Female coaches who are trained
in delivering Kabaddi. We promote the sport
of Kabaddi amongst young people; we
deliver coaching and training programmes.
Through the sport of Kabaddi we encourage
diversity and cohesion.
Many want to take advantage of the popularity of the sport, especially the casino sites for online betting. Take our word, if you review the top casino web operators, be sure you won't find Kabaddi at any of them.

Kabaddi - For the Fit and Agile The game does not require any equipment & any special kit. What is required is agility, good muscular co-ordination, presence of mind, dare, quick reflexes, good lung capacity, and an ability to anticipate the opponents moves. Kabaddi is closely related to Yoga, the ancient Indian science that advocates a healthy mind in a healthy body. The attacker or raider in Kabaddi has to withhold his breath while chanting Kabaddi- Kabaddi and invade the opponents territory, where he has to try to touch as many opponents or antis as possible while warding off their combined efforts to capture him. With holding breath is akin to Pranayama of yoga, a means to control body and mind. Pitching ones wits against those of seven opponents and remaining unscathed is no mean task! This calls for tremendous fitness of body and mind. The game is thus most suitable for youngsters. More hisotry...
Kabaddi & Regeneration of Communities & Sustainable Development

Kabaddi as a sport can have a wider impact on re-
generation as highlighted in the PAT 10 Arts and
sport report, which found that:

Participation, and the provision of services to
support participation, in arts and sport, can help
address neighbourhood renewal by improving
communities' 'performance' on the four key
indicators of more jobs, less crime, better
health and improved educational attainment. There are various distinctive contributions, which
the arts and sport have to offer to tackle the
causes of social exclusion. These can be
summarised under the headings of: growing
industries; engaging and strengthening local
communities; and an emphasis on people, not
buildings or places. The project also adopts some of the PAT 10 Key
principles, which help to exploit the potential of
arts/sport in regenerating communities including: Valuing diversity: people have a basic right to
explore their own culture and identity in terms and
forms, which they choose and determine. This
diversity should be recognised as a profound
strength, and a rich source of ideas and practice,
which the whole cultural sector may draw upon.
Whether in sport, art or approaches to local
development, the diversity of community activity
can often provide breakthroughs, which more
established and better-funded parts of the sector
struggle to find.

News Flash

Southampton Kabaddi Association will be represented at this year’s National Mela at the NEC in Birmingham from the 18th – 20th November. We will be running a series of demonstrations,
workshops and presentations on the sport and its history with
the help of Polygon School, Southampton. Please come and
join us and give us your support.

Brief History & Official Kabaddi Bodies in India/Asia

Kabaddi is being played in the Asian sub- continent from times immemorial. Kabaddi received its first Inter-National exposure during the 1936 Berlin Olympics, demonstrated by Hanuman Vyayam Prasarak Mandal, Amaravati, Maharashtra. The game was introduced in the Indian Olympic Games at Calcutta, in the year 1938. The Amateur Kabaddi Federation of India, the new body, came into existence in the year 1972. This body was formed with a view to popularize the game in the neighboring countries and organize regular National level Men and Women tournaments. After the formation of this body, sub-junior and junior sections were included in Kabaddi national level tournaments, as a regular feature.

Brief Highlights of Kabaddi

Kabaddi is a popular Asian game with its roots in India. Click here for more information about playing. Basically a combative out door sport, with seven players on each side, it can also be played on synthetic surface indoors. The duration of the game is 45 minutes for men & junior boys with a 5minute break in between for the teams to change sides. In the case of women/girls & sub junior boys, the duration is 35 minutes with a 5 minute break in between. Each side takes alternate chances at offence and defense. The core idea of the game is to score points by raiding into the opponents court and touching as many defense players as possible without getting caught on a single breath. The players on the defensive side are called Antis while the player of the offense is called the Raider. The attack in Kabaddi is known as a Raid. The antis touched by the raider during the attack are declared out if they do not succeed in catching the raider before he returns to home court. These players can resume play only when their side scores points against the opposite side during their raiding turn or if the remaining players succeed in catching the opponents raider.

Although people in India can bet on Kabaddi, the sport hasn't been introduced to the sportsbooks for online gambling yet. That is why the game can't be found at the sports market for fantasy gaming as well.

 

 

 

 

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